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Showing posts from November, 2018

The Halfpenny Green Queen Victoria Stamp From The 1894 Second Waterlow Issue of Niger Coast Protectorate - Part 1

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I see that I missed posting last week about the Second Waterlow Issue of Niger Coast Protectorate. Facebook issued me a temporary sharing ban last week and because of that I did not share last week's post to this blog. So, this week I will give you the hyperlinks to both this week's and last week's post, as well as my synopsis.

Last week I wrote an overview post for the Second Waterlow issue of Niger Coast Protectorate. This issue is the unwatermarked one that was issued with the new designs incorporating the name "Niger Coast Protectorate" and no mention anywhere of "Oil Rivers". I discussed the general aspects of the issue and gave detailed printing data from Ince and Osborne for all the known printings.

You can read that full post here:

https://brixtonchrome.com/blogs/nigerian-stamps-and-postal-history/the-1894-second-waterlow-issue-of-niger-coast-protectorate

This week I looked at the halfpenny green in detail and covered all aspects of it except th…

The Unwatermarked Queen Victoria Waterlow Issue of Niger Coast Protectorate Part Ten

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This week's post is much shorter than usual, as I am finding it necessary to write shorter posts if I want to have any chance of being able to continue to post on a weekly basis. 
Today's post finishes off this first Waterlow issue, with a detailed study of the perforations on the 1 shiling black and then a quick look at some of the postal history that can be found from this issue. 
In terms of perforations, my detailed study turned up some 36 different measurements. Most of these were very close together, but it was common to have different measurements on three or sometimes 4 sides of the same stamp. By far, the most common perforations were variations of 15 and 14.5 x 15. I proposed that I believe the Gibbons practice of grouping 14.5-15 and 13.5-14 together in the same ranges to be too simplistic, and I argue that there are really 6 basic measurements, that also exist as compounds. 
Postal history is scarce for this issue, and much of what can be found on the market is ph…