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Friday, July 12, 2013

Comments Please...

Before I publish my next post I would like to call upon all of you to comment on my posts. This is a vast and complicated area of philately. While there is a considerable body of knowledge that exists, much if it resides either between the ears of many established philatelists, or has been published in newsletters or journals that are either out of print, or not widely available. If you go to any seller of philatelic handbooks, you will find very few reference sources for Nigeria. Those publications that do exist tend to focus on pre-1914 issues. Except for articles written by King George VI specialists, articles dealing with the King George V Keyplates and articles written by my esteemed colleagues Rob May and Jeremy Martin dealing with modern definitives, there are very few sources dealing with the issues of post 1914 Nigeria.

Therefore in the interests of increasing the existing body of knowledge, I think it is important to share our knowledge with one another. Commenting is one of the best ways to facilitiate this exchange of ideas. Most of what I will present on this blog are my observations arising out of my study of Nigerian stamps and postal history. Very little will be undisputable fact. I am most interested in engaging all of you regarding the subjects that I am posting about.

So please, speak up. Don't be shy!



2 comments:

  1. The Nigeria Silver Wedding Set of Stamps c1948 is widely considered the nicest of its kind. What are your thoughts?

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  2. When you say the nicest of its kind, I assume you mean of all commemorative issues of this time? I certainly think that the engraved high values are beautiful examples of engraver's art and early examples of the new minimalist "modern" aesthetic, with the simple frames and uncluttered appearance. I personally do not care for the photogravure low values - I think they lower the appeal of the set. I think the set should either have been all Photogravure (bicolour would have looked great) or all engraved. But I think the mixed printing methods made the set less appealing than could have been the case.

    My favourite commemorative issue of all time has to me the 1935 Silver Jubilee common design followed by the 1951 University Issue - which was a very beautiful bicoloured set.

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